Students

Thanks Jen for your testimonial.
College students, learn about the negative effects of ObamaCare on your personal healthcare, while in college, right here … In addition, college students and graduates, here are some statistics, videos and information regarding your struggle for employment in Illinois:

Slate.Com (May 2014) Reports: “In its recent chartbook on youth joblessness, the Economic Policy Institute reported that roughly 8.5 percent of college graduates between the ages of 21 and 24 were unemployed. That figure is based on a 12-month average between April 2013 and March 2014, so it’s not a perfect snapshot of the here and now. Still, it tells us that the post-collegiate job market, just like the rest of the labor market, certainly isn’t nearly back to normal.More worrisomely, the EPI finds that a total of 16.8 percent of new grads are “underemployed,” meaning they’re either jobless and hunting for work; working part-time because they can’t find a full-time job; or want a job, have looked within the past year, but have now given up on searching.”


THE LABOR PARTICIPATION RATE FOR 16-24 YEAR OLDS HAS BEEN ON A STEADY DECLINE SINCE 2005 – VIEW THIS CHART ON DAN LIPINSKI’S FAILURE TO BRING A VIBRANT ECONOMY TO YOUNG PROFESSIONALS & MILLENNIALS

Slate.Com Continued: Recent B.A. grads, working in jobs that don’t require a college degree, are in occupations that pay far less than in the past. It used to be that more than half of these overeducated young workers would find themselves in “good” jobs—meaning that they’d pay at least $45,000 in today’s market. Today, less than 40 percent do. Meanwhile, more than a fifth of this group were in low-wage jobs, meaning they paid $25,000 a year or less.Today’s crop of new B.A.s are staring at roughly 8.5 percent unemployment, 16.8 percent underemployment. Close to half of those who land work won’t immediately find a job that requires their degree, and for those stuck in that situation, there are fewer “good” jobs to go around. Welcome to adulthood, class of 2014.”



U.S. News & World Report (December 2013): “The number of college graduates working minimum wage jobs is nearly 71 percent higher than it was a decade ago, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest figures. As of 2012, 284,000 college graduates were working at or below the minimum wage, up from 167,000 in 2002 and more than two times the pre-recession low of 127,000 in 2006. The cohort includes an estimated 30,000 people with masters’ degrees, a figure that is more than twice as high as it was in 2002 and three times as high as in 2006.”

Bloomberg.Com (June 2014): “Young people are also getting off to a slower start. They are delaying homeownership and some big-ticket purchases because of student debt and underemployment. Student-loan borrowers retreated from home buying in 2013 for the second year in a row, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York said last month. Young adults without student debt have a net worth that’s seven times higher than those who do, a report from Pew Research showed. They’ve done exactly the right thing. They have the right skills. It’s not a slam dunk that you will come out after college in better shape than before you went.”

“There are thousands of young recent college graduates, just like Jen (above), that are trying to stream into the workforce every semester and are being held up through no fault of their own. Perpetual politicians, like 10-year incumbent Dan Lipinski and the policies that he supports, holds this emerging workforce “at bay,” frustrating graduates who endlessly fill out job applications without success of landing a position. College graduates have worked hard to get to where they are, but an overwhelming negative factor still remains – ObamaCare! Over 1-million 400-thousand student’s healthcare will be negatively affected by ObamaCare [Learn More Here]. In addition, employers can’t hire without knowing the full implications of the (ObamaCare) law, that could bring their companies to their knees, which in turn leaves the college graduate at home without work. I am a successful businesswoman, entrepreneur and summa cum laude graduate of Governors State University. I know what it takes to create jobs through the private sector and without government intrusion. I’ll work with congress, businesses and state & local legislatures to get government out of the way and turn this economy around.You’ve paid enough for your education, now its time for that education to starting paying you back!Let me help fight for you in congress! Together we can make a difference.” — Sharon Brannigan.


sophie

handforsharon

Thank you to the Young Republicans
for posting their supportive video and blog article
concerning “The War on Women”
[Read Their Informative Blog Here]